Last edited by Mikacage
Tuesday, February 4, 2020 | History

4 edition of The Middle East: U.S. policy, Israel, oil and the Arabs. found in the catalog.

The Middle East: U.S. policy, Israel, oil and the Arabs.

Congressional Quarterly, Inc.

The Middle East: U.S. policy, Israel, oil and the Arabs.

  • 345 Want to read
  • 29 Currently reading

Published in Washington .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States,
  • Middle East,
  • Middle East.
    • Subjects:
    • Jewish-Arab relations.,
    • Petroleum industry and trade -- Middle East.,
    • United States -- Foreign relations -- Middle East.,
    • Middle East -- Foreign relations -- United States.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 100.

      Statement[Edited by Robert A. Diamond]
      ContributionsDiamond, Robert A., ed.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsDS63.2.U5 C64 1974
      The Physical Object
      Pagination100 p.
      Number of Pages100
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5045172M
      ISBN 100871870576
      LC Control Number74005252
      OCLC/WorldCa866523

      In no small measure as a result of its own decisions, the Jewish state has no recognized or secure borders. Although General Fazlollah Zahedi was a nationalist, he did not agree with the Mosaddeq's lenient attitude towards the communist Tudeh party, which the United States had also become increasingly concerned with, fearing Soviet influence spreading in the Middle East. Gulf Arabs, and even some of their rulers, cannot shake the sense that the war was not fought for international law, self determination and human rights, as the senior Bush administration claimed, but rather to protect US access to oil and to enable the US to gain a strategic toehold in the region. Once in power, Za'im made several key decisions that benefitted the United States.

      Most Arab states have made a similar evolution toward favoring just such a peace settlement. Za'im also improved relations with two American allies in the region: Israel and Turkey. A large-scale counterinsurgency operation in Greece from was partially motivated by the concern that the "rot" of independent nationalism there might "infect" the Middle East, Acheson warned. Aid to Yemen was cut off within months of the newly unified country's first democratic election in Furthermore, as they are now more dependent than ever on the government for their survival, the Iraqi people are even less likely to risk open defiance. The implications of this for existing suppliers, the global spot price, economic growth, OPEC and the world's consumers are enormous.

      To this day, the United States maintains very close ties with Saudi Arabia, which despite being labeled a "moderate" Arab regime, adheres to an extremely rigid interpretation of Islam and is among the most repressive regimes in the world. Despite varying degrees of foreign dependency, all jealously guard their independence and freedom of action. From the middle of last century Washington's foreign policy priority in the Middle East was to establish U. Walt of Harvard's John F. This is not an issue of access, it is primarily about control. No Arab state, however, recognized Israel.


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The Middle East: U.S. policy, Israel, oil and the Arabs. book

Who is an Arab? Programs[ edit ] The Council advances its mission through three programs: the quarterly journal Middle East Policythe Capitol Hill Conference Series for policy makers and their staff, and professional development workshops for educators through the TeachMideast arm.

He was following long-established, well-mapped Arab and Chinese trade routes. China is dependent on Middle East oil supplies but confident that the self-interest of vendors and diplomacy make the use of force largely irrelevant to the security of energy supplies.

The politics of the homeland may define national interests but a clear-eyed view of the realities of the world beyond it is essential for their successful prosecution. Nor, as a country that seeks no enemies, is China prepared to play the role of mediator in the Middle East.

The Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein then took over the mantle, shifting status overnight from favored friend to new Hitler when he invaded Kuwait in an effort to displace U. The boycott was particularly powerful; at the time, Arab nations supplied 37 percent of the oil consumed by the noncommunist world.

It will be a landmark.

The 100 Best Middle Eastern History & Politics Books

His National Security Council outlined the basic reasons: the US supports corrupt and oppressive governments and is "opposing political Israel economic progress" because of its interest in controlling the oil resources of the region. Members of Israel groups may also speak Arabic, but they might not identify themselves as Arabs.

Washington must support the Palestinians' right to statehood in the West Bank and Gaza, including a shared Jerusalem that would serve as the capital of both Israel and Palestine.

A member of the U. Although — for complex reasons — the official figures are much lower, well over million Chinese are Muslim, and the number is growing. Japan was helped to industrialize, but the U. It hopes for productive relations with all. Moreover, the United States had provided the Middle East with highly skilled petroleum engineers.

Policies designed to minimize such traumatic events will be far more successful than military threats in encouraging moderation in Islamic countries.

Two hundred forty-one Marines were killed when their barracks was hit by a suicide truck-bomb in Octoberprompting a U. Arms sales are also a means of supporting military industries faced with declining demand in Western countries.

All the rest had been deliberately massacred in cold blood. This was a major boon to the Western industrial powers, though extremely harmful to the long-term interests of the Arab world; and reduction in the real cost of oil was also of critical importance for the Reaganite veneer of prosperity.

You can find the same things when the Wall Street Journal does analyses of opinion there today. Chomsky takes the major points of State Department rhetoric and systematically and brilliantly, destroys them all.

The book focuses on several important themes: the search for national identity in a multiethnic, multireligious state; the struggle to achieve economic development and modernity in a traditional society; Control could be most easily maintained via a number of despotic feudal oligarchies in the Gulf which ensured the extraordinary wealth of region would be shared between a small number of ruling families and US oil companies, rather than European commercial competitors or the population of these states.

Therefore, in latethe British government asked the U. To link arms transfers with a given country's human rights record would lead to the probable loss of tens of billions of dollars in annual sales for American weapons manufacturers, which are among the most powerful special interest groups in Washington.

To effectively challenge the threat from radical Islamic movements, the US must shift its focus from trying to crush such movements to pursuing policies that discourage their emergence. While very few Muslims support terrorism - recognizing it as contrary to the values of Islam - the concerns articulated by bin Laden and others about the US role in the region have widespread resonance and will likely result in new recruits for terrorist networks unless and until the US changes its policies.Apr 29,  · Making excellent use of the previously overlooked papers of Max Ball, who directed the Oil and Gas Division of the Department of the Interior, Gendzier methodically reveals the significant role that oil played in US calculations about the emerging State of Israel and how it could be used as a vehicle for achieving US goals in the Middle East.

The Middle East has been a central focus of the United States’ foreign policy. The purpose of the current research is to shed light on the United States’ economic and political presence in the Middle East region before and after World War I and after World War II to understand how United States’ presence has developed in the region and what motives were behind its atlasbowling.com: Atallah S.

United States foreign policy in the Middle East

Al Sarhan. Afghanistan Africa Arab Spring Arctic Barack Obama Beijing Brazil Canada China corruption Democracy Egypt elections EU Foreign Policy human rights India Iran Iraq ISIS Israel Libya Middle East NATO North Korea Nuclear Obama Oil Pakistan Reza Akhlaghi Russia South China Sea Syria Taliban Terrorism Trump Turkey U.S.

Ukraine United Nations United. Israel was admitted as a member of the UN in and saw rapid population growth, primarily due to migration from Europe and the Middle East, over the following years.

Israel fought wars against its Arab neighbors in andfollowed by peace treaties with Egypt in and Jordan in U.S. corporate interests in control of Middle East's oil.

From the middle of last century Washington's foreign policy priority in the Middle East was to establish U.S. control over what the State Department described as "a stupendous source of strategic power and one of the great material prizes in world history", namely the region's vast.

In his book Double Vision: How The Press Distorts America’s Views of the Middle East, the American-born Israeli writer Ze’ev Chafets catalogued the ills that plagued U.S. news media coverage of the Middle East in general, and Israel in particular. Chafets, who had served as the director of Israel’s Government Press Office, noted that [ ].